Billy Strange Tells The Story Behind Nancy Sinatra’s Hit “These Boots Are Made For Walkin'”


In this video arranger Billy Strange talks about the recording session and the history behind the Nancy Sinatra hit “These Boots Are Made For Walkin'”.

Nancy Sinatra’s “These Boots Are Made For Walkin'” was number 1 50 years ago. “These Boots Are Made For Walkin’,” hit number 1 on Billboard’s and Cash Box’s national singles charts on February 26, 1966. Besides Nancy’s great singing it was Billy Strange’s skills as an arranger and co-producer that made this song immortal.

In 2010 I talked to Billy Strange (1930-2012) for at his home in Franklin, TN, about ”Boots“ and he told me how he came up with the famous sliding bass intro played by Chuck Berghofer and why songwriter and producer Lee Hazlewwod didn’t want Nancy to record ”Boots“. You can watch the interview in the video above.

Billboard’s December 25, 1965 “Spotlight Singles” review of “Boots” recognized the hit potential of the song:

Having hit the Hot 100 chart with her ‘So Long Babe,’ Miss Sinatra has top of the chart potential with this fine folk-rock material from the pen of Lee Hazlewood. Her vocal performance and the Billy Strange driving dance beat should move this one rapidly up the chart.

More information about “Boots” on Nancy Sinatra’s website.

Billy Strange had a extraordinaire career as a guitarist, singer, recording artist, arranger, conductor, songwriter, composer and producer. He worked with Nat King Cole, Frank Sinatra and Elvis Presley. He also worked as a studio guitarist in Los Angeles in the nineteen fifties and sixties. Here you can find his huge but incomplete discography.

Bill Withers Talks About The Decline Of The Music Industry

Publicity photo of Bill Withers (1976, Columbia Records).

Publicity photo of Bill Withers (1976, Columbia Records).

 

 “I grew up in the age of Barbra Streisand, Aretha Franklin, Nancy Wilson,” he says, still musing on the Grammys. “It was a time where a fat, ugly broad that could sing had value. Now everything is about image. It’s not poetry. This just isn’t my time.”


Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/features/bill-withers-the-soul-man-who-walked-away-20150414#ixzz3Xz2NoBtw

Country-Pop Singer Jeanne Black (1937-2014): The Woman Behind The One Hit Wonder

Country-pop singer Jeanne Black, who had a million-selling hit with “He’ll Have To Stay” in 1960, passed away on October 23, 2014 in Orem, Utah — two days shy of her 77th birthday. According to her son Josh Shipley she was suffering from Alzheimer’s.

Jeannie Black was born on October 25, 1937 in Pomona, California.
Her biggest hit “He’ll Have To Stay” was the answer song to Jim Reeves’ “He’ll Have To Go”. It sold over one million copies worldwide. Because she could never repeat this success, she was labeled as “one hit wonder”. But she was more than that. Jeanne Black was a versatile singer with a dramatic talent. She was not only a fine ballad singer, but could also sing western swing, pop, rock ‘n’ roll and even proved that she was able to sing the blues.

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All photos in the slideshow were taken between 1956 and early 1960s. (Courtesy of Billy Strange)

From 1956 until 1959 Jeanne Black was part of Cliffie Stone’s radio and TV show “Hometown Jamboree” that broadcasted live from the Harmony Park Ballroom in Anaheim, California. The show paved the way for many country musicians of the west coast. Among others Tennessee Ernie Ford, Zane Ashton (aka Bill Aken), Speedy West and Molly Bee played on Hometown Jamboree.

In 1960 Jeanne Black signed a record contract with Capitol. She worked very close with guitarist Billy Strange. He not only  accompanied her on stage and in the music studio, but he was also her arranger and music coach and they became lovers. They parted in the early sixties. Billy Strange became a famous studio musician and arranger in Los Angeles. He worked with stars like Elvis Presley, Frank and Nancy Sinatra and Nat King Cole. He was also a successful song writer and music publisher. After breaking up with Billy Strange, Jeanne Black married Mark Shipley. Together the rose six children and ran community theatres in California and Utah. In 1999 she finally married her early love Billy Strange. They lived together in Franklin, TN until he died in 2012.

In the video Jeanne Black talks about how she and her youngest sister Janie auditioned for Cliffie Stone in 1956 and how she became a singer and recording artist. And while browsing through old issues of country music magazine “Country Song Roundup”, she and Billy share memories and remember the first time they saw Elvis Presley on TV.

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Whitney Houston (1963 – 2012): Tribute Photo Gallery

Photos: LIFE photo archive hosted by Google

Gitarrist Phil Baugh demonstriert klassische Country-Stile

Phil Baugh (1936-1990) ist ein zu unrecht vergessener Gitarrist und Studiomusiker. Stilistisch bewegte er sich zwischen Country, Rockabilly, Pop und Jazz. Ein Eindruck seiner Spielkunst vermittelt obiges Video. Es wurde aus dem Song Country Guitar zusammengeschnitten. Ursprünglich wird zwischen den einzelnen Solos gesungen. Vermutlich stammt das Video aus dem Jahr 1965. Weiss jemand Genaueres? Um welche Fernsehshow handelt es sich?

Country Gitarrist Phil Baugh

Baugh demonstriert die Spielweise folgender Gitarristen: Les Paul, Billy Byrd (spielte für Ernest Tubb), Merle Travis, Luther Perkins (Gitarrist von Johnny Cash), Chet Atkins, Hank Garland und Duane Eddy. Am Schluss legt Phil Baugh in seinem eigenen Stil los. Und wie er loslegt… Im Video spielt Phil Baugh eine Mosrite Gitarre.

Weitere Infos: Phil Baugh… a tribute

Guitar-Legend and Master-Arranger Billy Strange Celebrates 80th Birthday

Nancy Sinatra, Billy Strange (middle) and Lee Hazlewood in 2003.

Today Billy Strange celebrates his 80th birthday in Nashville, TN. Here’s a video interview with Billy Strange I did. He talks about working with The Beach Boys, Nat King Cole, Phil Spector and Nancy Sinatra.

Billy Strange helped the Beach Boys, Elvis, Frank and Nancy Sinatra and many others to make hits.

He was a number one studio guitarist in the music studios of Hollywood in the 1950s and 1960s. You can hear his guitar on songs like “Surfin’ U.S.A.”, “Sloop John B.” and countless other Beach Boys and surf songs. He’s also famous for playing the haunting guitar on “Bang Bang”, the song that was used by Quentin Tarantino in “Kill Bill”. His arranging skills made songs like “These Boots Are Made For Walkin'”, “Some Velvet Morning” and “Something Stupid” immortal.

Chilliwack (The Collectors) – 40th Anniversary

Chilliwack (former The Collectors) Canadian rock band

Chilliwack: Jamie Bowers, Brian MacLeod, Bill Henderson, Glenn Miller, and Ross Turney. Photo: pnwbands.com

Canadian rock band Chilliwack (former The Collectors) celebrates its 40th anniversary at the River Rock Casino in Richmond on May 21 and 22.

The Vancouver Sun wrote an article about the anniversary and there’s a video of the band rehearsing “Lydia Purple”.

Speaking of Lydia Purple: former Chilliwack/Collectors bass player and singer Glenn Miller remembers how it was produced.